Monthly Archives

September 2017

Snake Oil and Social Media

By | social media, regulation, drug promotion

In 2017, advertising and promoting products is a minefield.  The availability of detailed and extensive information on consumer spending habits provides countless ethical pitfalls that are only magnified when the product in question is a drug.  In the past only magazine ads and TV commercials were utilized for drug advertising, now we have an array of choices that don’t always feel like marketing, but more like a conversation with a good friend.

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Not So Nobel Awards

By | humor

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Why do old men have big ears? Can smiling at a crocodile affect your desire to gamble?  And most importantly, can cats act as both a liquid and a solid?

These are the questions that keep us awake at night.  Fortunately, there are scientists working diligently on these puzzles, as well as many other weird and curious questions.  Their efforts have not gone unnoticed, and most recently were celebrated at the 2017 Ig Nobel Awards, a scientific recognition of the strangest and most obscure scientific experiments or studies done in that year.

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Personalized Medicine: The Future of Genetic Testing?

By | genetic sequencing,, drug development

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You’re feeling under the weather, with a cough that just won’t go away, so you decide to visit your doctor.  After a few minutes of one-on-one time, with some poking and prodding, you may be walking out of the office with a prescription in hand and on the way to feeling better.  How much more personal does it get? Perhaps not surprisingly, it can get a lot more personal, and it has nothing to do with your doctor, and everything to do with science.

In our current system of medicine, your treatment plan has very little to do with you specifically; most likely it is the exact same treatment your doctor would give to anyone with the same condition.  Medicine today is based on “standards of care,” the most prudent course of prevention or treatment for the general population.  With medication treatment for depression, for example, those standards may mean treatment with an SSRI (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor), followed by a second trial if the first one fails. If the second treatment fails, doctors and patients move on to the next one and the next in a trial and error approach.

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AI Innovation in Pharma

By | Uncategorized

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Artificial intelligence is more than just a concept for the newest blockbuster movie, it is moving into mainstream science and the pharmaceutical industry as well.  The Korea Pharmaceutical and Bio-pharma Manufacturers Association has recently announced the launch of a team focused on purchasing artificial technology for drug development.  Artificial intelligence computing systems can be used to analyze molecular interactions, and predict drug efficacy and side effects.  The technology can be utilized to guide and optimize clinical trial planning, greatly reducing the timeline for new drug development.

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